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Electrifying Eroica

Our full orchestra returns to the stage, featuring the piece which we were rehearsing when our world was interrupted. Powerful symbolism permeates the work, the most perfect example of resilience in face of adversity. Also on the program, a new VIS commission featuring the words of Nanaimo Poet Laureate Tina Biello , with music by Vancouver composer Katerina Gimon.

Concert Programme

Conducted by        Pierre Simard

Katerina Katerina Gimon        Playing into Silence *Premiere

BEETHOVEN         Symphony no. 3 (Eroica ) in E-flat major, op. 55

Dory Hayley
GUEST ARTIST

SID WILLIAMS
THEATRE
JAN 23, 2022

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Tina Biello is a poet, playwright, actor and mask artist and teacher. She is the current Poet Laureate for Nanaimo, 2017-2020. She has honed her skills as a poet over the years working with many fine poets from B.C., including Patrick Lane, Kate Braid and Betsy Warland. Her work has appeared in literary publications and is included in numerous anthologies, edited by Patrick Lane since 2008, published by Leaf Press. See writing section for a full list of publications.

Tina has a long background in Theatre as an actor, playwright and performer/teacher of Commedia dell’Arte and emotional mask work. She has worked with students from high school through to University Theatre Departments as well as adults. She also performs her own work with these masks.

 

Read more at tinabiello.com

Katrina Gimon

Named as one of Canada's hot 30 classical musicians under 30 by the Canadian Broadcasting Company; composer, improviser, and vocalist Katerina Gimon's uniquely dynamic, poignant, and eclectic compositional style is rapidly gaining her a reputation as one of the most distinctive emerging voices in contemporary Canadian composition. Katerina’s music has been described as “sheer radiance” (Campbell River Mirror), “imbued…with human emotion” (San Diego Story), and capable of taking listeners on a “fascinating journey of textural discovery” (Ludwig Van). Her works have been performed across Canada, the United States, and Europe at prominent events such as ACDA Conferences (National and Regional), Choral Canada’s Podium Conference, and as part of the Vancouver Opera Festival, as well as at renowned venues such as Carnegie Hall and the Orpheum Theatre. Recent commissions include new music for the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, the University of Montana, Open Ears Festival of Music and Sound, the Hamilton Children’s Choir, and the Orpheus Choir of Toronto. She is currently the composer-in-residence for female vocal ensemble Myriad and is primarily based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

 

Read more at katerinagimon.com

Ludwig van Beethoven (baptised 17 December 1770– 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the classical and romantic eras in classical music, he remains one of the most recognized and influential musicians of this period, and is considered to be one of the greatest composers of all time.

Beethoven was born in Bonn, the capital of the Electorate of Cologne, and part of the Holy Roman Empire. He displayed his musical talents at an early age and was vigorously taught by his father Johann van Beethoven, and was later taught by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe. At age 21, he moved to Vienna and studied composition with Joseph Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and was soon courted by Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in Opus 1 in 1795.

The piece was a great critical and commercial success, and was followed by Symphony No. 1 in 1800. This composition was distinguished for its frequent use of sforzandi, as well as sudden shifts in tonal centers that were uncommon for traditional symphonic form, and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. In 1801, he also gained notoriety for his six String Quartets and for the ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his third and fifth symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His condition worsened to almost complete deafness by 1811, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public.

During this period of self exile, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works; his seventh symphony premiered in 1813, with its second movement, Allegretto, achieving widespread critical acclaim. He composed the piece Missa Solemnis for a number of years until it premiered 1824, which preceded his ninth symphony, with the latter gaining fame for being among the first examples of a choral symphony. In 1826, his fourteenth String Quartet was noted for having seven linked movements played without a break, and is considered the final major piece performed before his death a year later.

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

The Symphony No. 3 in E-flat majorOp. 55, (also Italian Sinfonia EroicaHeroic Symphony) is a symphony in four movements by Ludwig van Beethoven. One of the composer's most celebrated works, the Eroica symphony is a large-scale composition that marked the beginning of Beethoven's creative middle-period.

Composed mainly in 1803–1804, the work is grounded in the Classical symphonic tradition while also stretching boundaries of form, length, harmony, and perceived emotional and possibly cultural content. It has therefore widely been considered an important landmark in the transition between the Classical period and the Romantic era.

Symphony No. 3 is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns (the 1st in E-flat, C, and F; the 2nd in E-flat and C; and the 3rd in E-flat), 2 trumpets in E-flat and C, timpani in E-flat and B-flat (in the 1st, 3rd, and 4th movements) and in C and G (in the 2nd movement), and strings.

The work is in four movements:

  1. Allegro con brio (12–18 min.) (E-flat major)
  2. Marcia funebreAdagio assai (14–18 min.) (C minor)
  3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace (5–6 min.) (E-flat major)
  4. Finale: Allegro molto (10–14 min.) (E-flat major)

Read more on Wikipedia.org...


Dory Hayley, soprano
Praised for her “very personal creative power” (Badener Zeitung) and her “amazing coloratura skills” (Opera Canada), Dory Hayley has been a soloist with the Vancouver Symphony, the Bourgas Symphony, the Allegra Chamber Orchestra, the Turning Point Ensemble, and Capriccio Basel, and has appeared in recital in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. She has performed in festivals such as Sonic Boom, the Happening Festival, Gulangyu Piano Festival, Performer’s Voice Symposium, New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival, and the Atempo Festival of Caracas, and with organizations like the SMCQ, Chants Libres, CIRMMT, Codes d’accès, Vancouver New Music, the Little Chamber Music Series That Could, and the Land’s End Ensemble. She is a member of the Erato Ensemble, the Broadwood Duo, and the Hayley-Laufer Duo.
An enthusiastic performer of contemporary music, Dory has worked with composers such as Helmut Lachenmann, Georges Aperghis, Diógenes Rivas, Owen Underhill, and Jordan Nobles, and created roles in Mark Haney’s Omnis Temporalis and Michael James Park’s Diagnosis Diabetes.
A former Visiting Scholar at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute, Visiting Artist at University at Buffalo’s Creative Arts Initiative, and Visiting Faculty Artist at the Afghanistan National Institute of Music, she currently teaches at Vancouver Community College. She is the Artistic Co-Director of the Blueridge Chamber Music Festival.
Dory pursued vocal studies at McGill University, the University of British Columbia, and the Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien, and has received grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Koerner Foundation, the Social Sciences and Research Council of Canada, and the Conseil des arts et des letters du Québec. She holds a Doctor of Music degree from Université de Montréal.

 

Read more at doryhayley.com

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By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Vancouver Island Symphony, Box 661, Nanaimo, BC, V9R 5L9, https://www.vancouverislandsymphony.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact