SATURDAY March 14, 2020 7:30 PM

Iconic Beethoven

250 years after his birth, Beethoven still stands as one of the greatest creative minds in history; his revolutionary Eroica Symphony ushered classical music into a new era, while the Triple Concerto remains one of the only examples of its kind. This concert truly features all facets of Beethoven – strength and power, but also elegance, nostalgia, clarity and most of all – pure joy!

Guest Artists

Calvin Dyck         Violin

Cameron Crozman         Cello

Philip Chiu         Piano

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Ludwig van Beethoven (baptised 17 December 1770– 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the classical and romantic eras in classical music, he remains one of the most recognized and influential musicians of this period, and is considered to be one of the greatest composers of all time.

Beethoven was born in Bonn, the capital of the Electorate of Cologne, and part of the Holy Roman Empire. He displayed his musical talents at an early age and was vigorously taught by his father Johann van Beethoven, and was later taught by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe. At age 21, he moved to Vienna and studied composition with Joseph Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and was soon courted by Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in Opus 1 in 1795.

The piece was a great critical and commercial success, and was followed by Symphony No. 1 in 1800. This composition was distinguished for its frequent use of sforzandi, as well as sudden shifts in tonal centers that were uncommon for traditional symphonic form, and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. In 1801, he also gained notoriety for his six String Quartets and for the ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his third and fifth symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His condition worsened to almost complete deafness by 1811, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public.

During this period of self exile, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works; his seventh symphony premiered in 1813, with its second movement, Allegretto, achieving widespread critical acclaim. He composed the piece Missa Solemnis for a number of years until it premiered 1824, which preceded his ninth symphony, with the latter gaining fame for being among the first examples of a choral symphony. In 1826, his fourteenth String Quartet was noted for having seven linked movements played without a break, and is considered the final major piece performed before his death a year later.

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

Zur Namensfeier (French: Jour de fête, English: Feastday or Name day), Op. 115, is a symphonic overture in C major by Ludwig van Beethoven completed in 1815, and first performed on Christmas Day 1815. It is dedicated to Polish prince Antoni Radziwiłł, who is remembered for his patronage of the arts. The piece was never one of Beethoven's more popular works and is seldom played today.

Its title refers to the feast of St Francis of Assisi, the name day of the Austrian emperor Franz I, 4 October, and while Beethoven made an attempt to complete the work for this day in 1814, he was unable to finish it in time, so he set aside work on it until the following spring. The theme at the beginning is related to that which he used to set Schiller's Ode to Joy in his Ninth Symphony nine years later.

In spite of its late opus number, it is a middle-period composition. Beethoven used ideas which he had sketched between 1810 and 1814; his earliest "late period" compositions are usually dated to 1816.

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

Ludwig van Beethoven (baptised 17 December 1770– 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the classical and romantic eras in classical music, he remains one of the most recognized and influential musicians of this period, and is considered to be one of the greatest composers of all time.

Beethoven was born in Bonn, the capital of the Electorate of Cologne, and part of the Holy Roman Empire. He displayed his musical talents at an early age and was vigorously taught by his father Johann van Beethoven, and was later taught by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe. At age 21, he moved to Vienna and studied composition with Joseph Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and was soon courted by Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in Opus 1 in 1795.

The piece was a great critical and commercial success, and was followed by Symphony No. 1 in 1800. This composition was distinguished for its frequent use of sforzandi, as well as sudden shifts in tonal centers that were uncommon for traditional symphonic form, and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. In 1801, he also gained notoriety for his six String Quartets and for the ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his third and fifth symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His condition worsened to almost complete deafness by 1811, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public.

During this period of self exile, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works; his seventh symphony premiered in 1813, with its second movement, Allegretto, achieving widespread critical acclaim. He composed the piece Missa Solemnis for a number of years until it premiered 1824, which preceded his ninth symphony, with the latter gaining fame for being among the first examples of a choral symphony. In 1826, his fourteenth String Quartet was noted for having seven linked movements played without a break, and is considered the final major piece performed before his death a year later.

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

Ludwig van Beethoven's Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C majorOp. 56, more commonly known as the Triple Concerto, was composed in 1803 and later published in 1804 by Breitkopf & Härtel. The choice of the three solo instruments effectively makes this a concerto for piano trio, and it is the only concerto Beethoven ever completed for more than one solo instrument. A typical performance takes approximately thirty-seven minutes.

Beethoven's early biographer Anton Schindler claimed that the Triple Concerto was written for Beethoven's royal pupil, the Archduke Rudolf of Austria. The Archduke, who became an accomplished pianist and composer under Beethoven's tutelage, was only in his mid-teens at this time, and it seems plausible that Beethoven's strategy was to create a showy but relatively easy piano part that would be backed up by two more mature and skilled soloists. However, there is no record of Rudolf ever performing the work—it was not publicly premiered until 1808, at the summer "Augarten" concerts in Vienna—and when it came to be published, the concerto bore a dedication to a different patron: Prince Lobkowitz (Franz Joseph Maximilian Fürst von Lobkowitz).

The concerto is divided into three movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Largo (attacca)
  3. Rondo alla polacca

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

Ludwig van Beethoven (baptised 17 December 1770– 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the classical and romantic eras in classical music, he remains one of the most recognized and influential musicians of this period, and is considered to be one of the greatest composers of all time.

Beethoven was born in Bonn, the capital of the Electorate of Cologne, and part of the Holy Roman Empire. He displayed his musical talents at an early age and was vigorously taught by his father Johann van Beethoven, and was later taught by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe. At age 21, he moved to Vienna and studied composition with Joseph Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and was soon courted by Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in Opus 1 in 1795.

The piece was a great critical and commercial success, and was followed by Symphony No. 1 in 1800. This composition was distinguished for its frequent use of sforzandi, as well as sudden shifts in tonal centers that were uncommon for traditional symphonic form, and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. In 1801, he also gained notoriety for his six String Quartets and for the ballet The Creatures of Prometheus. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his third and fifth symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His condition worsened to almost complete deafness by 1811, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public.

During this period of self exile, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works; his seventh symphony premiered in 1813, with its second movement, Allegretto, achieving widespread critical acclaim. He composed the piece Missa Solemnis for a number of years until it premiered 1824, which preceded his ninth symphony, with the latter gaining fame for being among the first examples of a choral symphony. In 1826, his fourteenth String Quartet was noted for having seven linked movements played without a break, and is considered the final major piece performed before his death a year later.

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

The Symphony No. 3 in E-flat majorOp. 55, (also Italian Sinfonia EroicaHeroic Symphony) is a symphony in four movements by Ludwig van Beethoven. One of the composer's most celebrated works, the Eroica symphony is a large-scale composition that marked the beginning of Beethoven's creative middle-period.

Composed mainly in 1803–1804, the work is grounded in the Classical symphonic tradition while also stretching boundaries of form, length, harmony, and perceived emotional and possibly cultural content. It has therefore widely been considered an important landmark in the transition between the Classical period and the Romantic era.

Symphony No. 3 is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns (the 1st in E-flat, C, and F; the 2nd in E-flat and C; and the 3rd in E-flat), 2 trumpets in E-flat and C, timpani in E-flat and B-flat (in the 1st, 3rd, and 4th movements) and in C and G (in the 2nd movement), and strings.

The work is in four movements:

  1. Allegro con brio (12–18 min.) (E-flat major)
  2. Marcia funebreAdagio assai (14–18 min.) (C minor)
  3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace (5–6 min.) (E-flat major)
  4. Finale: Allegro molto (10–14 min.) (E-flat major)

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

 

Calvin Dyck is in his 21st season as Concertmaster for the Vancouver Island Symphony, and is also the director for the Abbotsford Youth Orchestra.  Calvin has played concerts in over 15 countries, and is in demand as a producer, teacher, conductor and adjudicator.

In July, 2020 the Abbotsford Youth Orchestra will be touring in Scotland and will perform in Abbotsford, Scotland on Canada Day along with the Pacific Mennonite Children’s Choir.

Calvin’s company “Songs Strings and Steps” produces over 25 events a year and his Christmas show draws over 2700 people. As an adjudicator Calvin has had the opportunity to work with students all over Canada including in Victoria, Whitehorse, Winnipeg and Toronto.

Although a college aptitude test recommended a career as a tug boat captain, Calvin finished a DMA in Violin Performance at the University of Southern California, with minors in Conducting, Music Education and Music History. He currently has about 25 students.  Some of his former students are currently studying at universities across Canada, and one is now a member of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

Calvin has been awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for service to the community.  He has also been awarded an honorary Doctor of Humanities by Trinity Western University.

Calvin lives in Abbotsford with his wife Heather, and they will celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary in 2020.

Described as a “mature artist with a profound musical imagination,” (Toronto Concert Reviews),

Cameron Crozman is being hailed as one of Canada’s leading young cellists. He is 2nd prize laureate of both the OSM Standard Life and the Eckhardt-Gramatté Competitions. He was the youngest recipient of the Canada Council Michael Measure's Prize and was one of 12 cellists chosen internationally to compete at Kronberg Academy's 2014 Grand Prix Emanuel Feuermann.

Maintaining an active schedule, engagements have taken Cameron to such prestigious venues as the Shanghai Oriental Arts Center, Berliner Philharmonie, Paris Philharmonie, Philadelphia’s Mann Center, Montreal’s Maison Symphonique, and Canada’s National Arts Centre. He has performed with the Montréal, Winnipeg, Quebec, and Kitchener-Waterloo symphonies, I Musici de Montréal, London Sinfonia, Orchestre du Conservatoire de Paris, and Orchestre des Lauréats du Conservatoire. In 2012, he toured North America playing Dvořák’s Cello Concerto with the National Youth Orchestra of Canada.

An avid chamber musician, Mr. Crozman has already performed with the likes of James Ehnes, André Laplante, Huw Watkins, Martin Beaver, Gérard Caussé, James Campbell, and members of the Ébène, New Zealand, and Penderecki String Quartets. He regularly appears at festivals including Ottawa Chamberfest, Toronto Summer Music Festival, Montreal Chamber Music Festival, Seattle Chamber Music Festival, Helsinki Musica Nova, Beauvais Cello Festival, Birmingham Frontiers Festival, and Musique et Vin festival at Clos Vougeot in Burgundy. His performances have been broadcast on CBC, Radio France, Radio Classique, and Medici.tv. He released his debut CD, Cavatine, on the ATMA Classique label in January 2019, and his second album, Benjamin Britten: Solo Cello Suites on the Printemps des arts de Monte-Carlo Label in March 2019.

Cameron is extremely grateful for the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and Sylva Gelber Foundation. He is currently exploring the cello canon on the 1769 Joannes Guillami cello, on loan from the Canada Council for the Arts Instrument Bank. He was previously awarded the use the “Bonjour” Stradivarius cello in 2015 from the Canada Council.

“A pianist-painter who transforms each musical idea into a beautiful array of colors” (La Presse), Philip Chiu is acclaimed for his brilliant pianism, sensitive listening, and a stage presence that eschews the hermit-pianist image and favours openness, authenticity, and connection with audiences. Inaugural winner of the Mécénat Musica Prix Goyer ($125,000), Philip has become one of Canada’s leading musicians through his infectious love of music and his passion for creation and communication.
Philip concertizes extensively as soloist and chamber musician and has performed solo recitals and chamber music concerts in most major venues across Canada, as well as concert halls in France, Japan and the United States. He recently made his debut for the La Jolla Music Society in California in their 50th anniversary season, and will be appearing in Maine and Massachusetts in fall 2019. Chamber music partners have included James Ehnes, Emmanuel Pahud, Regis Pasquier, Noah Bendix-Balgley, Bomsori Kim, Johannes Moser, and Raphael Wallfisch. He has a long-standing violin-piano duo with Jonathan Crow, concertmaster of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and violinist of the New Orford String Quartet. Philip is a veteran touring artist of Prairie Debut, Jeunesses Musicales Canada, and Debut Atlantic, having toured the country 14 times with their generous support.
He immensely enjoyed programming four unique and imaginative concerts as Cecilia Concert’s 2018/2019 Artist-in-Residence, and is looking forward to further exploring his creative side as Artist-in-Residence for Montreal’s La Chapelle Historique du Bon-Pasteur in 2020. Other upcoming projects include a recording/concert tour of John Burge’s 24 Preludes for Solo Piano, as well as a recording/concert project with Pentaèdre, honouring the music of Jacques Hétu. In addition to his performing activities, Philip created the Collaborative Piano Program at the Domaine Forget International Academy and consulted for national and international competitions as a recognized expert in collaborative piano. He has also juried for provincial, national, and international competitions.
Philip has recorded for Warner Music, Analekta, ATMA Classique, and CBC Music. He can be heard on BBC Radio 3, France Musique, ICI Musique, and CBC Music. He is eternally grateful for the support of Mécénat Musica, the Sylva Gelber Music Foundation, and the Canada Council for the Arts.

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By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Vancouver Island Symphony, Box 661, Nanaimo, BC, V9R 5L9, https://www.vancouverislandsymphony.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact