SUNDAY November 17, 2019 2-3 PM

Join us for a reception with musicians following performance!

Symphony Serenade

A true celebration of strings – more than a hundred in total to serenade you! Spend your afternoon with romantic and tuneful music. The crown jewel of our concert, Dvorak’s Serenade , has been described as “pure, cloudless goodness.” Come de-stress as we play the serenade.

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Antonín Dvořák's Serenade for Strings in E major  Op. 22, was composed in just two weeks in May 1875. It remains one of the composer's more popular orchestral works to this day.

Dvořák's Serenade for Strings consists of five movements:

  1. Moderato
  2. Menuetto: Allegro con moto
  3. ScherzoVivace
  4. Larghetto
  5. Finale: Allegro vivace

With the exception of the finale, which is in modified sonata form, each movement follows a rough ABA form. It is believed that Dvořák took up this small orchestral genre because it was less demanding than the symphony, but allowed for the provision of pleasure and entertainment. The piece combines cantabile style (first movement), a slow waltz (second movement), humorous high spirits (third movement), lyrical beauty (fourth movement) and exuberance (fifth movement).

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Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (3 February 1809 – 4 November 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period. Mendelssohn's compositions include symphoniesconcertospiano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the oratorio Elijah, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. The melody for the Christmas carol "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" is also his. Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions.

A grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was brought up without religion until the age of seven, when he was baptised as a Reformed Christian. Felix was recognised early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his talent.

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Felix Mendelssohn wrote twelve string symphonies between 1821 and 1823, when he was between 12 and 14 years old. Sinfonia no. 6 in E-flat major is one of these compositions.

The string symphonies are written for a string orchestra. String Symphony No. 11 also contains percussion (timpani, triangle, cymbals).

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Vivian Fung is a Canadian born composer. She composes music to be performed by orchestras, operas, quartets, and pianists. Her compositions have been performed internationally.

Fung's compositions blend Western musical forms with musical ideas from many cultures, including Balinese, Javanese gamelan, and folk songs from minority regions of China. Her personal heritage has played a strong role in her music.

Fung has received a number of awards and grants: the 2012 Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, New York Foundation for the Arts’ Gregory Millard Fellowship, ASCAP, BMI, American Music Center, MAP Fund, Music Alive!, and the League of American Orchestras, American Composers’ Forum, and the Canada Council for the Arts. Vivian has been composer-in-residence of the Delaware Chamber Music Festival, Music in the Loft chamber music series in Chicago, the San José Chamber Orchestra, and the Billings Symphony. Vivian Fung also completed residencies at the MacDowell, Yaddo, and Banff arts colonies, as well as residencies at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. She is also an associate composer of the Canadian Music Centre.

 

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Vivian Fung's Pizzicato is a short work for string orchestra, the duration of which the players never use their bows. The central sound produced is that of plucked strings as well as a few surprises in the middle and towards the end of the work. Inspired by listening to Asian folk music, the piece is influenced partly by the music of the Chinese instruments pipa and qin as well as by the energetic rhythms of the Indonesian gamelan.

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (8 September 1841 – 1 May 1904) was a Czech composer, one of the first to achieve worldwide recognition. Following the Romantic-era nationalist example of his predecessor Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed rhythms and other aspects of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. Dvořák's own style has been described as "the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them".

Dvořák displayed his musical gifts at an early age, being an apt violin student from age six. The first public performances of his works were in Prague in 1872 and, with special success, in 1873, when he was aged 31. Seeking recognition beyond the Prague area, he submitted a score of his First Symphony to a prize competition in Germany, but did not win, and the unreturned manuscript was lost until rediscovered many decades later. In 1874 he made a submission to the Austrian State Prize for Composition, including scores of two further symphonies and other works. Although Dvořák was not aware of it, Johannes Brahms was the leading member of the jury and was highly impressed. The prize was awarded to Dvořák in 1874 and again in 1876 and in 1877, when Brahms and the prominent critic Eduard Hanslick, also a member of the jury, made themselves known to him. Brahms recommended Dvořák to his publisher, Simrock, who soon afterward commissioned what became the Slavonic Dances, Op. 46. These were highly praised by the Berlin music critic Louis Ehlert in 1878, the sheet music (of the original piano 4-hands version) had excellent sales, and Dvořák's international reputation was launched at last.

 

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

Antonín Dvořák's Serenade for Strings in E major  Op. 22, was composed in just two weeks in May 1875. It remains one of the composer's more popular orchestral works to this day.

Dvořák's Serenade for Strings consists of five movements:

  1. Moderato
  2. Menuetto: Allegro con moto
  3. ScherzoVivace
  4. Larghetto
  5. Finale: Allegro vivace

With the exception of the finale, which is in modified sonata form, each movement follows a rough ABA form. It is believed that Dvořák took up this small orchestral genre because it was less demanding than the symphony, but allowed for the provision of pleasure and entertainment. The piece combines cantabile style (first movement), a slow waltz (second movement), humorous high spirits (third movement), lyrical beauty (fourth movement) and exuberance (fifth movement).

Read more on Wikipedia.org...

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Stay in tune with the Vancouver Island Symphony. Receive Symphony news, updates and information right to your inbox!


By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Vancouver Island Symphony, Box 661, Nanaimo, BC, V9R 5L9, https://www.vancouverislandsymphony.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact